NOBU HONG KONG

Nobu Hong Kong: Spring Omakase Dinner, Found in Translation


  23.03.16    Hong Kong


For the next couple of weeks, Nobu Hong Kong are running an eight course Spring Omakase menu for $1,300 per person, with optional Taittinger champagne pairing at $688. I was invited for a sneak peak following my interview with Nobu-San and it was, frankly, a dazzling display of beautifully-plated dishes.

Even if it was a succession of unfamiliar names, produce and techniques, somehow they all ended up translating perfectly on the plate. Some of the highlights included:

O-toro and saba sashimi, with punchy but appropriate chimichurri sauce and some ridiculously dinky micro tomatoes. Only in Japan.

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A ‘deluxe sushi assortment’. For once, a menu description that in no way exaggerates or spins. Comically good. I even loved the plate.

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Pan-seared Sarawa fillet with green garlic miso. Breathtaking. I wanted more. For breakfast the next day.

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Sauteed seasonal matagai (razor clams) with a salsa made from myoga. Not the Hong Kong-based yoga school, but Japanese ginger. A ponzu foam was the perfect hint of sweetness and bite.

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A5 Miyazaki Wagyu with a sensational wasabi pepper sauce, a Nobu signature:

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Cold Inaniwa Udon with uni and caviar. There are very few words to describe the joys of this bowl.

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Best of all, however, was the sampler of 6 oysters, three hot and three cold. These were, by a very long way, the best prepared oysters I’ve ever tasted. The oysters themselves were Japanese, as generous as a sumo wrestler’s packed lunch.

Top row, left to right:

Tempura with more of that ama ponzu; Grilled with bacon, apple and miso; Baked with creamy jalapeño

Second row, left to right:

Komomo sauce with caviar; New style with uni; Nobu salsa;

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If you in any way like oysters, trust me that you need this half dozen in your life. If you really like oysters, then hop on the Star Ferry now and wait in line. They’re that good.

Overall, this was a sublime dinner. Even if $1,300 is a serious chunk of change for a meal, not unlike my experience at Shinji by Kanaseka, when it comes to the top end of Japanese cuisine it’s worth every cent. Those 6 oysters alone would set you back HK$3-400 in a supermarket. So go, but get there fast as it finishes on 2nd April. I may just be waiting in line behind you.